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servicing of 7S26 + 7S36 movements.

Do these automatic movements require any perodic maintaince such as lubrication, if so what is the recomended time frame. Also does anyone know of any good books,links or whatever that explain how to learn to do this yourself. I would also like to learn how to properly accurize these movements, some are within 5sec a day while others seem to go off about 25sec a day. It would be nice to get them all to within a few seconds a day.
Answer:
Send me an e-mail at gfuentes@mminternet.com, and I'll provide you with some links related to regulating the 7S26 movement.

Regards,

Gallego
Answer:
Great info Gallego, only confusing part was that pushing the regulating pin toward the plus marking makes it run slower and toward the minus makes it run faster, without reading this I would have thought it was the other way around.
Answer:
...most regulators will have some form of pointer, or just a gap, near the + & -, or A & R (Advance & Retard) markings. You can see the pointer in the pic of a 7S26 regulator below. Think in terms of moving this pointer and it makes more sense. Move the regulator arm so that the pointer moves toward the "-" and the rate will decrease, move it toward the "+" and the rate will increase.

Paul.
Answer:
Thanks Paul, that really clears that up. Thinking in terms of which way the pointer moves and not which way you move the lever, (which would be the opposite way)totally clears up the confusion.
Answer:
that moving the regulator for one or another side is just the last procedure when regulating/adjusting the watch.

I am very far from being a watchmaker, but I'm a watch collector very interested in the mechanics of the watch, and I overhaul (cleaning, lubrification) my simpler and cheaper watches.

The regulator position is a mere matter of RATE, not the precision itself. Opposing to that, bad precision involves a number of things, that normally doesn't relate to the regulator itself.

In other words, moving the regulator will only solve anything if the watch is overhauled and adjusted. Then, you proceed to the regulation. Keep it in mind.

One thing is critical: the balance amplitude. Without a good amplitude, any attempt to regulate it is loss of time.

But if your watch is in good health, meaning that it is cleaned, lubrificated, and the amplitude is good, the balance is IN BEAT, and the balance-spring is well adjusted, then there are good chances that you will get a better RATE moving the regulator even without any timer like the Vibrograph.

But my tip is: don't do that if you doesn't know exactly what you are doing, and without knowing the effects of that, or you might end it very frustated. I can tell it for self-experience.

Sorry for the long message.

Regards,

Adriano
Answer:
Good informatrion Adriano and what you describe above sounds like a job best left to a professional. But the basic issue of cleaning and lubrication time frames, that is to say if the watch is in good working order seem vague at best. I've seen some posts on the varying boards recomending that this be done every 3 years to the other extreme viewpoint of "if it ain't broke don't fix it". I personally own a few automatics that are 0ver 15 years of age and still work fine and have never been serviced. As you say an amateur trying to clean and lube a movement could probably do more harm then good. Seiko must use some good engineering or lubrication with their auto movements as they seem to run forever even without regular maintaince.
Answer:
Yes, they can run perfectly for a long time without maintance. they are very robust in that aspect. But I think that is not correct to let the watch run for decades without it.

About doing the cleaning and lubrification by myself, I study a lot before trying it. I done it in about 10 watches of my collection, including some Seiko, and they work perfectly now, much better than before.

I have a Seiko 6119 that ran for 30 years without service.
But altough it was running, I let it to a watchmaker to service it and some things were really worn, like the escape wheel teeth. And have great influence on the precision.

I recommend overhauling every 5 years.

And more: amplitude is critical do minimize positional errors. It is impossible to a non-serviced watch to have great amplitude, so, it will suffer from big rate variations.

Regards,

Adriano